For Once in My Life" is a song written by Ron Miller and Orlando Murden for Motown Records' Stein & Van Stock publishing company, ... "It was a very big disappointment in my life.

[5] However, her version was not released until it appeared on her November 1966 album, Here I Am. Someday at Christmas is a Christmas album by Stevie Wonder, released on November 27, 1967 by Motown Records under its Tamla imprint. Spencer) and The Andantes (Jackie Hicks, Marlene Barrow, Louvain Demps), Additional instrumentation by The Funk Brothers, This page was last edited on 24 October 2020, at 06:21. ", Grammy Award for Best Pop Collaboration with Vocals, "BEHIND THE SONG: "For Once in My Life" «, "Cover versions of For Once in My Life by Barbara McNair", "Barbara McNair - Where Would I Be Without You / For Once In My Life - Motown - USA - M-1123", "Asia Pacific Arts: More Stories from Jeff Adachi", "The Funk Brothers and Motown Jazz - JazzTimes", "Item Display - RPM - Library and Archives Canada", "Danish single certifications – Stevie Wonder – For Once in My Life", "British single certifications – Stevie Wonder – For Once in My Life", "Karise Eden, the 'Black Caviar' of The Voice", Stevie Wonder's Journey Through "The Secret Life of Plants", 20th Century Masters – The Millennium Collection: The Best of Stevie Wonder, Superwoman (Where Were You When I Needed You), I Believe (When I Fall in Love It Will Be Forever), Background vocals are by Originals (Freddie Gorman, Walter Gaines, Hank Dixon, C.P. There are differing accounts of its earliest versions, although it seems that it was first recorded by Connie Haines, but first released in 1966 by Jean DuShon.

Stevie Wonder Live is a 1970 live album by American musician Stevie Wonder on the Tamla (Motown) label. All of Motown Records' previous Temptations releases were made on the Gordy label, which was discontinued and whose artist roster and back catalog was consolidated into the main Motown label in 1987.

Contrary to Gordy's instincts, "For Once in My Life" was a highly successful record, peaking at number-two on both the Billboard Pop Singles and Billboard R&B Singles[16] (it was held off from the number-one spot on each chart by another Motown single Gordy had originally vetoed, Marvin Gaye's "I Heard It Through the Grapevine").

The musical is based on Berry Gordy's autobiography To Be Loved: The Music, the Magic, the Memories of Motown (1994), and on the history of his founding and running of the Motown record label, and his personal and professional relationships with Motown artists such as Diana Ross, Smokey Robinson, Marvin Gaye, and Michael Jackson. Singer Jack Soo claimed that he was the first male artist to record a version of the song, after he joined Motown in 1965 as one of their first non-African American artists.

Jack Soo (Nick Yamana on Barney Miller) – Jack Soo had the rare honor of having the fourth wall broken for him on Barney Miller when he died of cancer in 1979. Billie Jean Brown, the head of the Motown Quality Control department, finally coerced Gordy into allowing Wonder's version to be released in October 1968.[15]. Spencer) and The Andantes (Jackie Hicks, Marlene Barrow, Louvain Demps), and instrumentation by The Funk Brothers. In 2006 Bennett teamed up with Stevie Wonder to record a ballad tempo version for his Duets: An American Classic album, for which Bennett and Wonder received a Grammy Award for Best Pop Collaboration with Vocals. Released in 1968 by Gordy (Motown) Records, Live at the Copa features new lead singer Dennis Edwards in place of David Ruffin. Some sources suggest that the song was originally written for McNair;[8] others that Gordy, hearing the song, insisted that she record it. The song also made its way into The Temptations 1998 made-for-television miniseries on NBC. The Temptations also recorded the song for their pop standards based album The Temptations in a Mellow Mood, released in July 1967. He lived in Oakland, California, and was caught up in the Japanese American internment during World War II.He was sent to the Topaz War Relocation Center in Utah; and fellow internees recalled him as a "camp favorite", an entertainer singing at dances and numerous events. Williams' most famous performance of the number was during The Supremes and Temptations' TCB television special in 1968, a performance cited as the apex of Williams' career.

It was his eighth studio album release. Other early versions of the ballad were issued by the Four Tops, the Temptations, Diana Ross and Tony Bennett, whose recording was the first to reach the pop charts.

Grammy Award for Best Pop Collaboration with Vocals, "BEHIND THE SONG: "For Once in My Life" « American Songwriter", "Cover versions of For Once in My Life by Barbara McNair", "Ron Miller Archives | The Year of Tony Bennett", "Barbara McNair - Where Would I Be Without You / For Once In My Life - Motown - USA - M-1123", "Asia Pacific Arts: More Stories from Jeff Adachi", "On Broadway - The Four Tops | Songs, Reviews, Credits", "In a Mellow Mood - The Temptations | Songs, Reviews, Credits", "The Funk Brothers and Motown Jazz - JazzTimes", "Item Display - RPM - Library and Archives Canada", "Danish single certifications – Stevie Wonder – For Once in My Life", "British single certifications – Stevie Wonder – For Once in My Life", "Karise Eden, the 'Black Caviar' of The Voice", Stevie Wonder's Journey Through "The Secret Life of Plants", 20th Century Masters – The Millennium Collection: The Best of Stevie Wonder, Superwoman (Where Were You When I Needed You), I Believe (When I Fall in Love It Will Be Forever), https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=For_Once_in_My_Life&oldid=985142029, Grammy Award for Best Instrumental Arrangement Accompanying Vocalist(s), Pages using infobox song with unknown parameters, Certification Table Entry usages for Denmark, Pages using certification Table Entry with streaming figures, Certification Table Entry usages for United Kingdom, Pages using certification Table Entry with streaming footnote, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, Background vocals are by Originals (Freddie Gorman, Walter Gaines, Hank Dixon, C.P. Personally, I dont want to do this lol. 1 US hits: Stevie Wonder's "Fingertips" (1963), The Supremes' Love Child (1968), and The Miracles' "The Tears of a Clown" (1968). Ty Hunter replaced Spencer when he left to go solo in the early 1970s. Barbara McNair's version of the song was recorded as early as October 1965, [7] and backed up by a symphony orchestra and produced by Frank Wilson.

Although he was working in show business as a stand-up comedian and nightclub emcee in San Francisco prior to them, the Broadway musical and then the movie Flower Drum Song (1961) were his breakthrough vehicles. Miller and Murden wrote the song in 1965 as a slow ballad, and passed it around various singers so that it could be tried out and refined.

Bennett also performed it on the grand finale of the sixth season of American Idol and in the Grammy Award-sponsored tribute Stevie Wonder: Songs in the Key of Life – An All-Star Salute, which aired February 16, 2015, on CBS. Wonder's version of the track is often singled out by bassists as the greatest example of James Jamerson's playing style, with no two bars of music played alike during the whole song; a completely improvisational line that is both melodic and complementary to Wonder's vocal. [10][11], The Four Tops recorded the song on their album 4 Tops On Broadway, released in March 1967 and, like McNair's recording, produced as a slow ballad by Frank Wilson.[12]. Gordy vetoed the single's release, and the recording was shelved. After celebrating The Temptations' (and Motown's) first Grammy Award win for "Cloud Nine", the actor who portrays Paul Williams (Christian Payton) sings the slow ballad version. [10][11], The Four Tops recorded the song on their album 4 Tops On Broadway, released in March 1967 and, like McNair's recording, produced as a slow ballad by Frank Wilson.[12].

[10] [11], The Four Tops recorded the song on their album 4 Tops On Broadway, released in March 1967 and, like McNair's recording, produced as a slow ballad by Frank Wilson. The production's music and lyrics are taken from selections from the Motown catalog.

[9] In later years, McNair re-recorded the song with a faster tempo. I didn’t have anything. Among its highlights were Michael Jackson's performance of "Billie Jean", Smokey Robinson's long-awaited reunion with The Miracles, a Temptations / Four Tops "battle of the bands", Marvin Gaye's inspired speech about black music history and his memorable performance of "What's Going On", a Jackson 5 reunion, and an abbreviated reunion of Diana Ross & the Supremes, who performed their final #1 hit, "Someday We'll Be Together" from 1969. Jack Soo was born Goro Suzuki on a ship traveling from Japan to the United States in 1917.

[4] [5] DuShon dropped "For Once in My Life" from her nightclub act and later said: "It was a very big disappointment in my life.

The song also made its way into The Temptations 1998 made-for-television miniseries on NBC. Then eighteen years old, Wonder had established himself as one of Motown's consistent hit-makers. I stopped singing it ‘cause I didn’t have the song. Spencer) and The Andantes (Jackie Hicks, Marlene Barrow, Louvain Demps), and instrumentation by The Funk Brothers. "For Once in My Life", issued by Tamla with "Angie Girl" as its B-side, was later included as the title track on Wonder's For Once in My Life album.

The most familiar and successful version of "For Once in My Life" is an uptempo arrangement by Stevie Wonder, recorded in 1967.

Singer Jack Soo claimed that he was the first male artist to record a version of the song, after he joined Motown in 1965 as one of their first non-African American artists.

[3] It was chosen "Pick Hit of the Week" by Detroit's WXYZ radio. Connie Haines was a contracted singer signed to Motown in 1965 and as indicated by the Motown session logs and tape information, she recorded the first version of the song at the label in July 1965. Wonder's version of the track is often singled out by bassists as the greatest example of James Jamerson's playing style, with no two bars of music played alike during the whole song; a completely improvisational line that is both melodic and complementary to Wonder's vocal. Looking Back, also later known as Anthology, is a triple LP anthology by American soul musician Stevie Wonder, released in 1977 on Motown Records. He is best known for his role as Detective Nick Yemana on the television sitcom Barney Miller.